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Grant Park

When Pigs Fly

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When Pigs Fly

The artist has collaborated to create new communities within Grant and Howell Parks via the Frisbee, an object synonymous with social park activity. As the game of Frisbee involves two or more people in the playing, the artist has used this form of interaction as a means to study the group dynamics of this familiar game. Having collaborated with Atlanta-based Frisbee groups in the development of When Pigs Fly, the artist has also introduced the work to connect new communities. Subversive political commentaries as well as a sense of humor are at play within the performance. For more information click here.

All are invited to participate in the Frisbee performances.


Michael Reese

Michael Reese is a photographer and conceptual artist. He received his BFA in Photography from the Atlanta College of Art. An interest and commitment to social practice in his work allows for an open experimentation and dialogue. Reese's work has been exhibited at the International Center of Photography and The Drawing Center both in New York City. www.michaelreesephotography.com


The Last Stand

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The Last Stand

The Last Stand is a symbolic requiem for all trees lost to reckless development, as well as a celebration of twelve ( of 200) old-growth trees that the artists, who are neighbors of Grant Park, saved from clear-cutting. This neighbor-to-neighbor interaction created the artist collaborative as well as pushed the social forum into a larger dynamic of creating a city-wide celebration of park space. The sculptural stringed instruments are composed of archival materials and aim to create visual impact through the use of color and materials (often used by the Office of Parks maintenance crew) translated into an experimental and aesthetic level.

Visitors to the park are invited to make music together on twelve custom-fitted, stringed tree instruments. The chorus of sound grows from an artistic vision to become a community serenade where participation and collaboration is encouraged by all. The artist team is committed to the preservation and education of trees and the natural environment in the production and final performance of the work. For more information click here.


Martha Whittington

Martha Whittington, an Adjunct Professor of 3-D design at the Savannah College of Art and Design, received her B.A. in Sculpture from the Kansas City Art Institute, and her MFA in Sculpture from Tyler School of Art. Ms. Whittington has exhibited both nationally and internationally with shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville Florida, the Museum of Contemporary Art Georgia, and the AMOA-Laguna Gloria, Austin Texas. She has also been the recipient of a six month artist residency at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art and has received grants from the City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs and Austin Green



Julie Newton

Julie Newton was educated at Mills College, the Sorbonne, and Emory University in Philosophy and Literature, She now transforms the theory and prose she once studied into short, humorous artist's books, and the occasional film and installation.




Coby Cranman

Coby Cranman has a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in Digital Media from the University of Georgia. He is a painter, entrepreneur and musician and is currently releasing his first solo album, Coby C:Two Thousand Something.




raymondo

Raymondo Vaughn is a self-trained sculptor, arts educator, and skater who specializes in site and subject-specific recycled metal work. Recent commissions include sports trophies composed of skateboard parts for MTV and outdoor sculptures constructed from the old farmhouse for the Columbus Botanical Gardens.


Witness

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Witness

As most trees in Grant Park are marked with individually-numbered tags, visitors to this park often wonder about the function of the tags. While these tags actually mark trees for maintenance purposes, they also simultaneously create a complex map of sorts, a mechanism for overlaying a multi-layered, nontraditional experience of the park space. By expanding the use of ordinary maintenance tags, the artist has created a new journey through the park by directing visitors via multiple learning pods associated with the numbered trees. Each pod presents a piece of information about Grant Park and asks for an element of viewer participation. The multi-faceted query draws from historical facts, relevant quotes, experiences and memories of park users, from the banal to the poetic and obscure. The layered facts and fictions are researched with City Historians as well as the local community residents of Grant Park. For more information click here.


Ruth Stanford

Ruth Stanford received an MFA from Carnegie Mellon University in 2005, a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin in 2000 and is currently teaching sculpture at Georgia State University. She also holds BS and MS degrees in zoology and worked as an endangered species ecologist prior to a career in art. In 2004, Stanford received an award for Outstanding Student Achievement in Sculpture from the International Sculpture Center. In 2005, she received a Creative Heights Artist Residency Grant from the Heinz Endowments to work in partnership with the Mattress Factory, a nationally prominent installation art venue in Pittsburgh.